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Today State Voter Fraud Cases Go Before Supreme Court To Decide If they Proceed With Hearings

Today State Voter Fraud Cases Go Before Supreme Court To Decide If they Proceed With Hearings

The US Supreme Court is set to consider President Trump’s voter fraud cases in Pennsylvania, Georgia and Michigan on Friday.

These three cases are on the Supreme Court docket for Friday.

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Here is more on today’s Supreme Court cases.

As a reminder, Pennsylvania Democrat officials changed the election rules weeks before the election without consulting the legislative branch. This is unlawful in the state. It will be interesting to see if SCOTUS is the latest lawless branch of government following today’s decisions.

Case Number 20-542

Republican Party of Pennsylvania, Petitioner v. Veronica Degraffenreid, Acting Secretary of Pennsylvania, et al.   It used to be Republican Party of Pennsylvania, Petitioner v. Kathy Boockvar, Secretary of Pennsylvania, et al.

Case Number 20-574

Jake Corman, et al., Petitioners v. Pennsylvania Democratic Party, et al.

Case Number 20-815

Timothy King, et al., Petitioners v. Gretchen Whitmer, Governor of Michigan, et al.

Case Number 20-845

Donald J. Trump for President, Inc., Petitioner v. Veronica Degraffenreid, Acting Secretary of Pennsylvania, et al. – Used to be Donald J. Trump for President, Inc., Petitioner v. Kathy Boockvar, Secretary of Pennsylvania, et al.

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Case Number 20-882

Donald J. Trump, et al., Petitioners v. Joseph R. Biden, et al.

From The Gateway Pundit

The question that arises from this, if the court does take these cases and rules that what the states did, creating changes outside the purview of the legislative, which is unconstitutional, what then happens to the election?

This by no means shows the court will take these cases; we have seen to date the courts are very reluctant to put themselves in the middle of the election, something they see as outside their scope of responsibility. Still, there is a case to be made for the actions of governors who sidestepped the legislative body to push changes outside what is permitted by the constitution.

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About The Author

Timothy Benton

Student of history, a journalist for the last 2 years. Specialize in Middle East History, more specifically modern history with the Israeli Palestinian conflict. Also, a political commentator has been a lifetime fan of politics.

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